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Favpack
02-21-2009, 11:51 AM
Well.... I did it - I really did it.

I looked at my retirement account for the first time in about 8 weeks. Sobering, demoralizing, humbling - all of the above. It is now about where it was in April.....2004.

Anyone out there want to have some serious off-season investment/retirement account / money discussion?

If not, - I'll move back to my investment forum.

Humbly - FP

4th and 1
02-21-2009, 01:08 PM
Well.... I did it - I really did it.

I looked at my retirement account for the first time in about 8 weeks. Sobering, demoralizing, humbling - all of the above. It is now about where it was in April.....2004.

Anyone out there want to have some serious off-season investment/retirement account / money discussion?

If not, - I'll move back to my investment forum.

Humbly - FP

Grin and bear it. You're certainly not alone. The best thing to do right now is nothing, and that includes checking on your balance. Can't tell if the market has hit it's low yet, but it's gotta be close. Thought it already had, and now it seems to be rejecting the stimulus plan. Brighter days ahead (I hope).

Favpack
02-21-2009, 01:15 PM
Grin and bear it. You're certainly not alone. The best thing to do right now is nothing, and that includes checking on your balance. Can't tell if the market has hit it's low yet, but it's gotta be close. Thought it already had, and now it seems to be rejecting the stimulus plan. Brighter days ahead (I hope).

Two stocks I own - Caterpiller and JCPenney - look horrendous on one hand, on the other - they have YIELDS higher than their PE/RATIOS! I'm no guru, but that is truly once in a lifetime stuff when you see a company with a dividend yield higher than it's price to earnings ratio.

I'll hang on to those two - though both look brutal right now.

4th and 1
02-21-2009, 02:05 PM
Two stocks I own - Caterpiller and JCPenney - look horrendous on one hand, on the other - they have YIELDS higher than their PE/RATIOS! I'm no guru, but that is truly once in a lifetime stuff when you see a company with a dividend yield higher than it's price to earnings ratio.

I'll hang on to those two - though both look brutal right now.

I would suspect there are other stocks in similar shape. Some companies are still performing well, but there are no buyers in the market. Huge sell-offs day after day forces a negative market in which holdings like yours take a beating when they should hold their own. What gets me is the fact that the market seems to be trained to react stronger to negative news than it does positive. For instance, the amount you lose in your 401K when the market is down 200 pts. will not be made up when the market is up 200 pts. Doesn't even come close. What's the deal? That money's somewhere. I hate to say it, but IMO there are alot of crooks on wall street and in company CEO's. And every once in a while they get caught.

15Adragon
02-21-2009, 03:36 PM
Not much to be positive about here. I would count my blessings and move to safety. The problem is that inflation is bound to kick in with the gov printing all of this money and this will slowly consume your position of safety.

How about counting our blessings - we know that will work. :)

mad_fan
02-21-2009, 04:27 PM
I'm not convinced it's too late to do something...especially with retirement accounts...
I discontinued ALL automatic investments into mutual funds in my IRA and SEP-IRA almost a year ago...the cash I contribute goes into Money Market funds...sure...I've lost to inflation...but I still get the tax breaks...and I haven't lost at the pace of the S&P...additionally...I've sold fund shares on rrallies...
In the regular brokerage account...it is and always has been mad_money...:D
I've made money TRADING...
But the core holdings have been decimated...
I first bought Bank of America at $42 and change...
Others don't look as bad...PG...JNJ...XOM...OXY...etc...
I guess I could sell it all and give up...and Uncle Sam would allow me to use $3000 of the losses each year against my other income...in about a hundred year...I'll have used up the losses...:)

GoOwls
02-21-2009, 06:44 PM
Two stocks I own - Caterpiller and JCPenney - look horrendous on one hand, on the other - they have YIELDS higher than their PE/RATIOS! I'm no guru, but that is truly once in a lifetime stuff when you see a company with a dividend yield higher than it's price to earnings ratio.

I'll hang on to those two - though both look brutal right now.

Don't sack the Cat stocks just yet.....one of the few things that will get a bump from The Obamessiahs rescue plan is infrastructure construction.....roads will be built and repaired....Cats will be needed....;)

twcpfan1
02-21-2009, 06:58 PM
TRS is usually unaffected by economic downturns. When it starts to get affected, then we have much more serious issues.

slorch
02-21-2009, 07:19 PM
Well.... I did it - I really did it.

I looked at my retirement account for the first time in about 8 weeks. Sobering, demoralizing, humbling - all of the above. It is now about where it was in April.....2004.

Anyone out there want to have some serious off-season investment/retirement account / money discussion?

If not, - I'll move back to my investment forum.

Humbly - FP

Same story here. i've bamboozled myself ( or maybe just coaxed) to somehow believe it is reasonable, with a 1 to 2 match by my employer, that everything would be Ok with my 401K. that is until I realized it had lost about 35-37% of its value from a year ago...

Now my salve in the wound is the fact that every dollar that I am still putting into my 401K is buying stuff on the cheap, so if and when there is a recovery( hopefully in the next 30 years) I'll have more shares than if the recession had never occurred.

We'll see...

our 401K is about 25-30% of our planned savings for retirement. We're not counting on social security, and the little $trillion that we just spent could very well be the nail in the coffin on that program, unless it miraculously does create more viable, longterm jobs...

We'll see.

We're trying to do the prudent things, but it looks tough. We are very fortunate that we started saving early, and we still have about 30 years to go( hopefully.) there will be time for a couple more adminstrations to clean up the mess we're in.