PDA

View Full Version : Permian spring game



odessapermian.com
05-21-2005, 06:54 AM
http://www.oaoa.com/sports/sp052105b.htm

KT2000
05-21-2005, 12:46 PM
From what ktchamp told me over the phone, it was definitely an intense display (if not always pretty) by Permian. Said there were a lot of guys flying around out there. He also mentioned yall lined up in everything from a straight T look to shotgun on offense. I guess that's the Brownwood/Burnet/Stephenville influence creeping through from the new coaching staff.

cougarcb16
05-21-2005, 03:05 PM
In a post game interview Coach Allman seemed pretty optimistic. I like his attitude and the way he goes at his buisness. I think Permian is looking to turn some heads this year.

KT2000
05-21-2005, 03:09 PM
In my opinion, Permian needs a year or two to really get accustomed to the new staff and new way of doing things. Also, that year or two will help cultivate the young talent they've got and get it ready to compete well on varsity.

cougarcb16
05-21-2005, 04:36 PM
Can you explain what you mean by getting accostomed to the new coaching staff? Wont there be new kids there in two years anyways? Also, does the new coaching staff really make that much of a difference? From a players standpoint, I dont care if I didnt even have a coach, I would still try and go out and win the most games I could.

MojoRaiderPower
05-21-2005, 04:37 PM
In a post game interview Coach Allman seemed pretty optimistic. I like his attitude and the way he goes at his buisness. I think Permian is looking to turn some heads this year.

That is the Old Permian Attitude!!! Talking permian foootball!! and Exicuting it on the Field!! :D

MojoRaiderPower
05-21-2005, 04:46 PM
In my opinion, Permian needs a year or two to really get accustomed to the new staff and new way of doing things. Also, that year or two will help cultivate the young talent they've got and get it ready to compete well on varsity.

One word two syllables, Playoffs!!! I too attended the spring game and i saw things i havent seen since Hollingshead! (swarming to the ball) and my favorite the wing T!! say what you may, but a good coach wins right away, and with his staff anything is possable!!

KT2000
05-21-2005, 05:09 PM
I don't know if I agree with the statement "a good coach wins right away." I believe Katy was 1-9 during Coach Johnston's first year, and didn't go to the playoffs until the third season (1986). Of course, most know what has happened between the late 80s up until now in the Katy program.

When Ron Lynch took over at Westfield in the late 90s, they also went 1-9 in year one, 6-5 in year two and 12-2 in year three.

I make this statement a lot because I really believe in it, but no system will ever be successful without talented players who can execute it efficiently. It usually takes time for a coaching staff to teach the players the finer points of their system and get them bigger/faster/stronger in their off-season regiment. Obviously, some coaches are better at doing those things than others and some players will pick things up faster than others. So, there's really no way to tell exactly how long it takes for a certain program to build up.

Of course, Permian isn't just any other program but none of the players on campus right now know what it's like to be in a playoff game. Roy Williams was still walking the halls when that happened last, and the current Permian seniors-to-be were in 2nd/3rd grade the last time the Panthers played for state in 95. Getting that Permian swagger back is going to be the hardest part, and the players will need to learn how to win games consistently again before that can happen.

In the past (again, just my outsider opinion), Permian was able to win many games even after coaching changes because they had players on campus that grew up going to state championship games and/or had already played/ dressed out for one themselves. They knew what it took to get to that level.

This is just my opinion, but I don't see it happening "overnight" at Permian in the current situation. I heard people saying the same things when Mills and Smith took over, so that's why I'll be skeptical until I see the proof on the field. Until then, it's all just talk and I'm sure the new Permian coaches (given their credentials) are preaching that to the players.

Anything is possible (and getting that community spirit back behind the guys is huge), but I'd be very surprised if Permian was able to make the playoffs in year one. However, I think the door could open because the district doesn't have nearly as many returning all-district players as it did last year, and I'd be very impressed if they manage to put things together that quickly.

odessapermian.com
05-21-2005, 06:23 PM
There is material to work with. If the staff can put the right pieces of the puzzle together I would not be surprised in the least to see Permian in the playoff hunt. With that said, I think logic dictates a cautious approach with an eye towards the future. I expect to see a lot of juniors playing this year, and it could come together very nicely in 2006, when we could see several experienced returning players in key positions.

MojoLand1
05-21-2005, 06:58 PM
We still have a ways to go, but the defense looked pretty salty.
It'll be fun watching this energy in August.
btw - enjoyed the convo with ktchamp97 on the sideline

MojoRaiderPower
05-21-2005, 07:06 PM
I don't know if I agree with the statement "a good coach wins right away." I believe Katy was 1-9 during Coach Johnston's first year, and didn't go to the playoffs until the third season (1986). Of course, most know what has happened between the late 80s up until now in the Katy program.

When Ron Lynch took over at Westfield in the late 90s, they also went 1-9 in year one, 6-5 in year two and 12-2 in year three.

I make this statement a lot because I really believe in it, but no system will ever be successful without talented players who can execute it efficiently. It usually takes time for a coaching staff to teach the players the finer points of their system and get them bigger/faster/stronger in their off-season regiment. Obviously, some coaches are better at doing those things than others and some players will pick things up faster than others. So, there's really no way to tell exactly how long it takes for a certain program to build up.

Of course, Permian isn't just any other program but none of the players on campus right now know what it's like to be in a playoff game. Roy Williams was still walking the halls when that happened last, and the current Permian seniors-to-be were in 2nd/3rd grade the last time the Panthers played for state in 95. Getting that Permian swagger back is going to be the hardest part, and the players will need to learn how to win games consistently again before that can happen.

In the past (again, just my outsider opinion), Permian was able to win many games even after coaching changes because they had players on campus that grew up going to state championship games and/or had already played/ dressed out for one themselves. They knew what it took to get to that level.

This is just my opinion, but I don't see it happening "overnight" at Permian in the current situation. I heard people saying the same things when Mills and Smith took over, so that's why I'll be skeptical until I see the proof on the field. Until then, it's all just talk and I'm sure the new Permian coaches (given their credentials) are preaching that to the players.

Anything is possible (and getting that community spirit back behind the guys is huge), but I'd be very surprised if Permian was able to make the playoffs in year one. However, I think the door could open because the district doesn't have nearly as many returning all-district players as it did last year, and I'd be very impressed if they manage to put things together that quickly.

just a couple of names, Mike Price, Bob Stoops, Gene Mayfield just off the top of my head,all won right away. im not saying all good coaches win right away, alot of them do. as far as the Permian Attitude, Coach Allman is teaching it to the kids. if you watch the video clips he is talking permian attitude to the media.

MojoLand1
05-21-2005, 08:26 PM
I like what he said after the Black-White game. The following is edited from the whole conversation, but for those of you that do not know where the video clips are located - http://www.kylgrafx.com/mojo/05bw.htm

cougarcb16
05-21-2005, 09:18 PM
I don't know if I agree with the statement "a good coach wins right away." I believe Katy was 1-9 during Coach Johnston's first year, and didn't go to the playoffs until the third season (1986). Of course, most know what has happened between the late 80s up until now in the Katy program.

When Ron Lynch took over at Westfield in the late 90s, they also went 1-9 in year one, 6-5 in year two and 12-2 in year three.

I make this statement a lot because I really believe in it, but no system will ever be successful without talented players who can execute it efficiently. It usually takes time for a coaching staff to teach the players the finer points of their system and get them bigger/faster/stronger in their off-season regiment. Obviously, some coaches are better at doing those things than others and some players will pick things up faster than others. So, there's really no way to tell exactly how long it takes for a certain program to build up.

Of course, Permian isn't just any other program but none of the players on campus right now know what it's like to be in a playoff game. Roy Williams was still walking the halls when that happened last, and the current Permian seniors-to-be were in 2nd/3rd grade the last time the Panthers played for state in 95. Getting that Permian swagger back is going to be the hardest part, and the players will need to learn how to win games consistently again before that can happen.

In the past (again, just my outsider opinion), Permian was able to win many games even after coaching changes because they had players on campus that grew up going to state championship games and/or had already played/ dressed out for one themselves. They knew what it took to get to that level.

This is just my opinion, but I don't see it happening "overnight" at Permian in the current situation. I heard people saying the same things when Mills and Smith took over, so that's why I'll be skeptical until I see the proof on the field. Until then, it's all just talk and I'm sure the new Permian coaches (given their credentials) are preaching that to the players.

Anything is possible (and getting that community spirit back behind the guys is huge), but I'd be very surprised if Permian was able to make the playoffs in year one. However, I think the door could open because the district doesn't have nearly as many returning all-district players as it did last year, and I'd be very impressed if they manage to put things together that quickly.

Thanks for that great post man. You really cleared things up for me. I get what your saying now, and I guess your right. But you never know what can happen. Maybe some Mojo Magic will kick in?

MojoLand1
05-24-2005, 10:50 PM
KT2000,
As usual, your post is well thought and pretty accurate.
Where Allman will/does have the advantage over the last coaches is that he was a part of the "old school" Permian... along with assistants Servance and Rabe. This is West Texas football - smashmouth football and Allman's predecessors never really grasped its concept... not fully.

We experienced the euphoric expectations of Mills. We learned and took a more 'wait-and-see' approach with Smith. I am fairly confident in saying, 'the people in odessa are actually WANTING for August to get here'. We know there's a good ways to go, but see positives that say we're in the right direction. I think the adults are onboard, and a confidence building non-district success will have the kids there, too.

M O J O - 'NUFF SAID

KT2000
05-24-2005, 11:01 PM
If the coaches have the guys working like champ is hearing, then that's definitely a step in the right direction.

I remember the coaches at Katy telling us, when I started in 96, if we wanted to be like Judson and Permian that we needed to be willing to pay the price for success (hard work, focus, dedication, etc.) and make sacrifices for something greater than individual glory.