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View Full Version : A 47 year old meets his heroes...finally.



GoOwls
10-20-2005, 03:36 AM
I was at the Garland/North Garland game last Friday. As many of you know who have read my posts before, my cousin was the wingback for Garland's Wing-T on the 1963-64 state championship teams. As a 5 and 6 year old boy, those guys were like Gods to me, heck, I even believed they could beat the Cowboys.

I got my tickets and sat down up against the press box and started watching the game. A nice older man and woman were sitting beside me and another nice older man was sitting in front of them talking to them.

At halftime, both men left and the lady was sitting by herself. I heard her mention to someone about the '99 state team. I asked he if she knew someone on the team. She said she was the mother of the Sims kid, who was the kicker for the Owls and had those dramatic kicks in the South Grand Prairie game, and who's father was the kicker for the 63-64 champ teams. His father tragicly died when he was a baby and it was the story of the year that he had kicked Garland to another state championship as his father had. We had a nice chat and I asked her if she could tell me more about those championship seasons as my cousin was on the team. She said I should ask the two men with her as they were Billy Adams, the QB both years and Ronnie Scoggins, the RB both years.

Well, I was dumbfounded, as at that time, both men had returned and I was introduced to them. Both players went on schollarship to SMU. Mr. Adams transfered to ETSU and led the team to two championships. He was in the Baltimore Colts training camp in 1969 when he had an injury in training camp that ended his career. Mr. Scoggins never played pro ball. These guys were my personal heroes from those two seasons, so far back in my youth.

Remember, there was almost no coverage about what happened to players back then. Those guys just disappeared into the sunset to me after the 64 season and were merely legends to me.....just names with no faces but filled with heroic lore.

I sat there the whole 2nd half and picked their brains and talked about my cousin with them (they both still talk to him on the phone about every 2 weeks or so), and about the championship seasons and what happened in their college and pro careers. It was one of the most special times of my 47 years as I finally got to meet the men who were my heroes, and get a bunch of questions answered about those years.

One thing that I found to be interesting and particularly enlightening, Mr Adams said that the reason they won those two championships was that most of the kids on the team played sandlot ball as little kids and even more played together from the sixth grade on through high school. He said they knew what the other was going to do before he did it. He said it allowed him to do timing patterns even back then, because they had done it for years and he knew where the guys would be. He said that from the sixth grade on through high school, those guys only lost one game, the 20-14 loss to Highland Park. He said they didn't really know how to lose, and they discounted the HP game because the game was at HP and the refs were less than hospitable. Speaks volumes for feeder systems from grade school through high school.

He also said that he called about 50% of his own plays, and on the comeback drive against Texarkana in 64, he called all the plays because there wasn't enough time to send in the plays. Unheard of these days.

Kids these days can't relate to this because there is so much info available that they practically know these high school studs these days. But for a guy who came up in an age of limited information about high schoolers, I only hope that someday you can experience something as wonderful as I experienced this past week.

lonny23
10-20-2005, 03:48 AM
I was at the Garland/North Garland game last Friday. As many of you know who have read my posts before, my cousin was the wingback for Garland's Wing-T on the 1963-64 state championship teams. As a 5 and 6 year old boy, those guys were like Gods to me, heck, I even believed they could beat the Cowboys.

I got my tickets and sat down up against the press box and started watching the game. A nice older man and woman were sitting beside me and another nice older man was sitting in front of them talking to them.

At halftime, both men left and the lady was sitting by herself. I heard her mention to someone about the '99 state team. I asked he if she knew someone on the team. She said she was the mother of the Sims kid, who was the kicker for the Owls and had those dramatic kicks in the South Grand Prairie game, and who's father was the kicker for the 63-64 champ teams. His father tragicly died when he was a baby and it was the story of the year that he had kicked Garland to another state championship as his father had. We had a nice chat and I asked her if she could tell me more about those championship seasons as my cousin was on the team. She said I should ask the two men with her as they were Billy Adams, the QB both years and Ronnie Scoggins, the RB both years.

Well, I was dumbfounded, as at that time, both men had returned and I was introduced to them. Both players went on schollarship to SMU. Mr. Adams transfered to ETSU and led the team to two championships. He was in the Baltimore Colts training camp in 1969 when he had an injury in training camp that ended his career. Mr. Scoggins never played pro ball. These guys were my personal heroes from those two seasons, so far back in my youth.

Remember, there was almost no coverage about what happened to players back then. Those guys just disappeared into the sunset to me after the 64 season and were merely legends to me.....just names with no faces but filled with heroic lore.

I sat there the whole 2nd half and picked their brains and talked about my cousin with them (they both still talk to him on the phone about every 2 weeks or so), and about the championship seasons and what happened in their college and pro careers. It was one of the most special times of my 47 years as I finally got to meet the men who were my heroes, and get a bunch of questions answered about those years.

One thing that I found to be interesting and particularly enlightening, Mr Adams said that the reason they won those two championships was that most of the kids on the team played sandlot ball as little kids and even more played together from the sixth grade on through high school. He said they knew what the other was going to do before he did it. He said it allowed him to do timing patterns even back then, because they had done it for years and he knew where the guys would be. He said that from the sixth grade on through high school, those guys only lost one game, the 20-14 loss to Highland Park. He said they didn't really know how to lose, and they discounted the HP game because the game was at HP and the refs were less than hospitable. Speaks volumes for feeder systems from grade school through high school.

He also said that he called about 50% of his own plays, and on the comeback drive against Texarkana in 64, he called all the plays because there wasn't enough time to send in the plays. Unheard of these days.

Kids these days can't relate to this because there is so much info available that they practically know these high school studs these days. But for a guy who came up in an age of limited information about high schoolers, I only hope that someday you can experience something as wonderful as I experienced this past week.
They could beat the 1963 and 1964 Cowboys. That's a guarantee! :D

Judson is Judson because they always had the feeder schools that ran the same offense and defense. The kids never played in another system and that's part of the struggle this year.

GoOwls
06-07-2006, 12:51 AM
I just wanted to bump this story back to the top. It's still over 12 weeks till the season starts, so I just thought I'd bump a HS football story up to give any of you interested something to read relating to HS football.

Slim-Rob
06-07-2006, 01:05 AM
That's really neat that you got to meet them. I bet u asked a lot of questions, I would have.